Shropshire opening

I have ventured into Ludlow and Church Stretton to see what is happening and what is open.  I have not been out and about much so some of this is gathered from guest and friends. This is not comprehensive.

So here is an idea of some places I know are open in Shropshire.

Ludlow Market is open with a one way system. The Castle and it’s cafe are open again for business.

Most shops were open except a few charity shops and some businesses which have unfortunately been effected by  Covid 19 Lockdown and will not open again. I am very sorry to see some of my favourite shops and cafes closed.

The car parks are busy but not full.

In Church Stretton most places seemed to be open although you may notice some changes when you enter them.  There are one way systems hand sanitizer stations and some places have shut off parts that are tricky with social distancing.

Heather Brae to the north of Church Stretton is open for business.

In Craven Arms the Shropshire Hills Discovery Centre is open, the cafe has less tables and was running  a less diverse menu.

The Land of Lost Content is open with a booking system.

Stokesay Castle is open, I don’t think the cafe is.

Ludlow Food Centre is open, I hear they have a very good system in side. The Plant Centre is also open and the Cafe.

Blists Hill is open, our last guests spent all day there when they ventured there.

In Craven Arms only one of the pubs is open, The Stables, drink only.

The Stokesay Inn has been taken over by local folks but is not yet open.

The Kangaroo at Aston On Clun is open with a booking system.

We hope when your come to Folly View you will find plenty to do

The Apple Tree at Onibury is open as is the Station at Marshbrook.

The take always in Craven Arms are open for business.

Don’t forget Tuffins do a lovely range of ready meals called Cook if you are not inclined to eat out.

 

Things to Do in Clun

Clun used to be a thriving commercial centre but is now a town of tranquillity. This does not mean nothing happens there. It has the Clun Green Man Festival and the Clun Valley Beer Festival. The Scamble, Ramble Amble stops in Clun for lunch and the Arts Alive Sportive starts from there.

Things to Do in Clun included walks along the River Clun. Going up the bank to the Church and turning left just before the Church will take you to Waterloo Ford.

Waterloo Ford in Clun

Waterloo Ford in Clun

Clun is divided in two by the River Clun. The older part is to the South of the river around the Church and up the bank. The more modern Norman part is to the north of the river around the Castle.

The Norman Castle ruin is built on the site of a motte and Bailey.

Clun Castle can be reached from the car park by the river as well as through the town. With lovely views down the Clun Valley towards Newcastle on Clun.

Clun Information Board

Clun Information Board

The Mill known as The Malevolent Mill is not open to the public but is somewhere interesting to stay. It is occasionally open on Heritage Days. It still has all its milling equipment.

St George’s Church at the top of Church Street is a Norman Church. There are some lovely views from here over the newer part of the town of Clun. Look for John Osbornes grave stone in the graveyard.

Clun Museum is in the old Town Hall. It holds local artefacts including details of a proposed railway from Craven Arms to Newcastle on Clun. Entrance fee is 50pence, this has got to be good value. Open Tuesday from 2pm and Saturdays from 11a.m., closed for lunch.

Packhorse Bridge dates from 1450. It is largely unchanged. This is the site of the annual battle between the Clun Green Man and the May Frost Queen.

Clun Packhorse Bridge

Clun Packhorse Bridge

Trinity Hospital and Almshouses provide accommodation for older members of the community. Built in 1614 round two quadrangles the grounds and gardens are open to the public.

Local beers can be sampled at the White Horse and the Sun Inn. The Sun Inn was built in the 15th Century of cruck construction and is grade two listed.

Clun is well worth an explore. Look at the information board in the river side car park for other things to do in Clun.

Land of Lost Content Web Site

Our friends at the Land of Lost Content museum have a new Web site which showcases this must-see attraction in Craven Arms.

The Land of Lost Content is an independent museum containing:

LOLC Pop Culture Ephemera

The museum – the result of a lifetime’s work by Stella Mitchell – has been running since 1991 and is now in it’s third home.

The museum features “everyone’s yesterdays” organised into 33 categorised displays across three floors – including:

  • Confectionary
  • Schooldays
  • Cleaning
  • Pop Music
  • Photography
  • Cosmetics & Hairdressing
  • Christmas
  • Victorians and Edwardians
  • Royalty & Regalia
  • Radio

and many more – along with a new category for 2017 – Carnival.

Land of Lost Content - Radio

Land of Lost Content – Radio

Image ©Land of Lost Content – used by kind permission of Stella Mitchell.

The Land Of Lost Content

The Land of Lost Content Museum

The Land of Lost Content

 
Did you know we have a museum in Craven Arms?

The Land of Lost Content is a museum of British Popular Culture in the 20th Century. There are displays on the Post Office, the Second World War, Sweets and many, many more.

There is so much to see that you will need to go again as you see something different every time you visit.

Stella Mitchell who runs the museum has designed a new display for the coming season about Boys and Girls Brigade. There will be other changes to discover as well, displays added to, can you spot them?

The Land of Lost Content will be open again from the 1st February until November 30th 2017. The museum is closed Wednesdays and Sundays.

There is a self-service cafe for refreshments.

Blists Hill Ghost Story Trail

Blists Hill Victorian Ghost Story Trail where you can learn about the customs and rituals of Halloween this year from the 22nd October until the 30th October.

Ghostly Apparitions

Ghostly Apparitions

Writer’s in the Victorian era wrote popular stories about ghosts and spirits. Charles Dickens gave us the Signal Man and MR James wrote too many ghost stories to list here. Some of these stories will be included on the Ghost Story Trail.

Explore Blists Hills many shops, cottages and work places and hear more about these games and traditions. See how ‘Trick or Treating’ has developed from children and adults dressing up and going door to door singing and offering prayers for “the souls of the givers and their friends”. Souls cakes would be given to the callers as ‘alms’. Soul Cakes, which are really biscuits will be for sale in the Bakery.

The history of Halloween goes back a lot further than the Victorian era but they were able to build on customs from previous generations with the advancement of technology bringing items into the more humble home.

Halloween was thought to be a night for prying into the future, conjuring up the super natural or ghostly apparitions. We do however still enjoy these parlour games on Halloween.

The Prince Albert Players will be performing each afternoon during the week. They will be including Shropshire Ghost Stories in their enactments along with scenes from Sweeney Todd.

Enjoy your Ghost Story Trail at Blists Hill and learning about a Victorian Halloween.

Blists Hill Victorian Town

The Iron Bridge at Ironbridge Gorge

The Iron Bridge at Ironbridge Gorge

 

Shropshire offers a vast array of wonderful places to visit and things to see and do. One of the most popular visitor locations in Shropshire is Ironbridge Gorge where the River Severn has cut a deep gorge. Originally called the Severn Gorge, the gorge now takes its name from the famous Iron Bridge – the first of its kind and an arch bridge made of cast iron. The bridge itself along with the small town of Ironbridge and the Ironbridge Gorge together form the UNESCO Ironbridge Gorge World Heritage Site.

Iron bridge is also home to the 10 museums spread along the Severn valley that make up the collection of The Ironbridge Gorge Museums.

One of these award-winning museums is the recreated Victorian town of Blists Hill Victorian Museum which enables you to experience life as it was over 100 years ago. The 52 acre museum comprises:

  • Blast Furnaces
  • a Bank where you exchange your money for pounds, shillings and pence to buy traditional fish and chips or use to visit the Victorian pub
  • a Victorian Pharmacy
  • an Iron Foundry
  • a Victorian cottage
  • an original Victorian Drapers
McClures Drapers at Blists Hill

McClures Drapers at Blists Hill

You can find more information about Blists Hill Victorian Town at their Web site here.

You can download the Blists Hill Victorian Town Map PDF here.

Iron bridge is 23 miles from Folly View Let and takes about 45 minutes by road.