Things to Do in Clun

Clun used to be a thriving commercial centre but is now a town of tranquillity. This does not mean nothing happens there. It has the Clun Green Man Festival and the Clun Valley Beer Festival. The Scamble, Ramble Amble stops in Clun for lunch and the Arts Alive Sportive starts from there.

Things to Do in Clun included walks along the River Clun. Going up the bank to the Church and turning left just before the Church will take you to Waterloo Ford.

Waterloo Ford in Clun

Waterloo Ford in Clun

Clun is divided in two by the River Clun. The older part is to the South of the river around the Church and up the bank. The more modern Norman part is to the north of the river around the Castle.

The Norman Castle ruin is built on the site of a motte and Bailey.

Clun Castle can be reached from the car park by the river as well as through the town. With lovely views down the Clun Valley towards Newcastle on Clun.

Clun Information Board

Clun Information Board

The Mill known as The Malevolent Mill is not open to the public but is somewhere interesting to stay. It is occasionally open on Heritage Days. It still has all its milling equipment.

St George’s Church at the top of Church Street is a Norman Church. There are some lovely views from here over the newer part of the town of Clun. Look for John Osbornes grave stone in the graveyard.

Clun Museum is in the old Town Hall. It holds local artefacts including details of a proposed railway from Craven Arms to Newcastle on Clun. Entrance fee is 50pence, this has got to be good value. Open Tuesday from 2pm and Saturdays from 11a.m., closed for lunch.

Packhorse Bridge dates from 1450. It is largely unchanged. This is the site of the annual battle between the Clun Green Man and the May Frost Queen.

Clun Packhorse Bridge

Clun Packhorse Bridge

Trinity Hospital and Almshouses provide accommodation for older members of the community. Built in 1614 round two quadrangles the grounds and gardens are open to the public.

Local beers can be sampled at the White Horse and the Sun Inn. The Sun Inn was built in the 15th Century of cruck construction and is grade two listed.

Clun is well worth an explore. Look at the information board in the river side car park for other things to do in Clun.

Ride the Shropshire Marches

A well-earned cycling break

A well-earned cycling break

Ride the Shropshire Marches Sportive is on Sunday 21st May.

There are two distances 65 miles starting at 9.30am and 35 miles starting at 10 am.

The start and finish are at Wistanstow Village Hall. The entrance fees are £25 for the longer distance and £20 for the shorter distance.

The funds raised from this event will go towards replacing the windows of Wistanstow Village Hall.

There is breakfast at the start, refreshments half way round at Church Stoke and tea and a bottle of beer at the finish.

The ride takes in stunning views of South Shropshire lets hope its a clear day to make the most of those climbs.

The event is sponsored by Wood’s Brewery.

Clun Castle Information

Within a previous blog post I described Clun Castle as one of the many castles built by the Normans along the Welsh Marches.

Even though Clun Castle is a Grade 1 listed building, the castle and grounds are free to enter under the management of English Heritage who have provided several information boards located at various points around and within the castle ruins.

These boards offer more detailed information as shown in the example below.

Clun Castle Information - A Border Fortress

Clun Castle Information – A Border Fortress

 

This board shows an artists impression of Clun Castle as it was thought to look in 1300.

The excerpt below from the information board offers a concise outline of the role of these castles:

After the Norman Conquest in 1066, the border between Wales and England remained an unsettled area. William the Conqueror granted lands here to his followers to defend the border. These men became powerful marcher lords, ruling their lands independently of royal control.

The image below is an aerial view of Clun Castle ruins and the surrounding area.

Aerial View of Clun Castle © Historic England Archive

Aerial View of Clun Castle © Historic England Archive

 

The image Aerial View of Clun Castle shown above is used with the kind permission of Historic England Archive whose copyright in the image is fully acknowledged. The image may not be used or reproduced without the permission of Historic England Archive who are the public body that looks after England’s historic environment. Historic England champion and protect historic places, helping people understand, value and care for them.

Clun Castle

Clun Castle is a ruined castle situated on the north bank of the River Clun and the western edge of the small town of Clun in South Shropshire close to the Welsh border. Clun is located 9 miles west of Craven Arms and 7 miles north of Knighton in the area known as both the Marches of Shropshire and the Welsh Marches.

Clun Castle

Clun Castle

Following the Norman invasion in 1066, William the Conqueror granted lands on the Welsh border to some favoured subjects who became Marcher Lords granted the rights to build castles and rule their feudal estates as if they were kings – provided they remained loyal to the English monarch.

Although ruined the remains of the rectangular keep and the two baileys do make the castle well worth visiting.

Clun Castle Keep

Clun Castle Keep

Many castles were constructed along the Welsh Marches including Clun Castle established by the Norman Lord Robert de Say.

Nowadays Clun Castle is a Grade 1 listed building and a Scheduled Monument owned by the Duke of Norfolk (who also holds the title of Baron of Clun) and is managed by English Heritage.

The castle ruins and grounds are open to the public and are free to enter.

Here are some links to more in depth information about Clun Castle:

a Wikipedia article about Clun Castle

the English Heritage Web page about Clun Castle

the Castles of Wales Web page for Clun Castle featuring lots of images

Clun Castle is well worth the visit and Clun itself also has a museum and places to eat and drink.

The Ludlow Food Festival 2016

Ludlow Food Festival 2016

Ludlow Food Festival 2016

The Ludlow Food Festival is now in its 21st year and has become the highlight of the many food events held in Shropshire, and is praised as one of the best Food Festivals in the UK.

This year the Ludlow Food Festival runs from Friday 9th September through Sunday 11th September at the main venue of Ludlow Castle.

The Festival objective is to celebrate the quality and diversity of the superb independent food and drink producers and suppliers across Shropshire, Ludlow and the Marches. This year the Festival hosts more than 180 local food and drink producers who are displaying their wares and offering samples – you can try local sausages and meats, a wide range of locally brewed real ales and even puddings.

There are also many food-related events including:

You can find more information about these trails at the Ludlow Food Festival Web site here.

The Festival also features a series of hands-on Masterclasses where you can try your hand at:

  • making your own sushi
  • preparing a Thai Green Curry
  • Pork Pie making

Ludlow was described by Sir John Betjeman as “probably the loveliest town in England” and more recently has been called the gastronomic capital of Shropshire. Ludlow is 9 miles and 20 minutes by road from Folly View Let.