Stokesay Castle in Photographs

Stokesay Castle

Stokesay Castle

This post shows Stokesay Castle in photographs. Stokesay Castle is a fortifyed medieval house and is considered the best preserved example in England. I’ve blogged about it before and this post provides some photographs that give more of a flavour of this unique building. The image of Stokesay Castle above was taken by Penny Mayes and is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 license.

Stokesay Castle is just one mile from Folly View Let and can be reached by footpaths from Folly View Let or by following the Shropshire Way from the Shropshire Hills Discovery Centre.

Stokesay Castle Gatehouse

Stokesay Castle Gatehouse

English Heritage manage Stokesay Castle and the current adult entrance fee is £7.60. Many of our visitors have commented how worthwhile and interesting it is to visit.

The Gatehouse at Stokesay Castle

The Gatehouse at Stokesay Castle

The Gatehouse is 17th century and is distinctively built in the Shropshire style.

Stokesay Castle Roof

Stokesay Castle Roof

The hall is 54.5 feet (16.6 m) long and 31 feet (9.4 m) wide and features three large, wooden 13th-century arches supporting the roof.

These photographs just provide a flavour of Stokesay Castle and many of our visitors to Folly View Let tell us that it is well worth a visit.

Stokesay Castle Tea Rooms

Stokesay Castle Tea Rooms

Stokesay Castle is one of the best-preserved fortified medieval manor houses in England. English Heritage who have restored Stokesay Castle, and who manage the property, have recently completed the conversion of nearby Stokesay Cottage – which stands beside the public entrance to the castle grounds – into a tea-room – the Stokesay Castle Tea Rooms.

Stokesay Castle Tea Rooms Tables

Stokesay Castle Tea Rooms Tables

 
An outside seating area is just visible in the photograph above – and offers visitors picturesque views across rolling fields to Long Mynd and the Shropshire Hills.

As well as the outdoor spaces the Tea Rooms feature a log burner to provide winter warmth for the anticipated visits from walkers and cyclists. The menu relies on locally-sourced ingredients and fresh foods including local specialities like Shropshire Fidget Pie, Shrewsbury Biscuits and Shropshire Blue. The focus on local food includes rosewater distilled from the roses in the castle courtyard used in the lavendar shortbread.

Serving Counter Stokesay Tea Rooms

Serving Counter in Stokesay Castle Tea Rooms

Stokesay Castle

Stokesay Castle

Stokesay Castle

Stokesay Castle is a fortifyed medieval house and is considered the best preserved example in England.

It forms a ‘comparatively complete ensemble’ of medieval buildings. The fact they remain largely unchanged is very unusual.

Previous owners have tried to repair what existed rather than rebuild and reconstruct.

It is Grade one listed and a scheduled Monument. It was largely build in the latter part of the 13th century by Laurence of Ludlow who was a wealthy wool merchant.

In the early part of the thirteenth century the land was owned by the de Say family who sold it to Laurence. The Stoke part of Stokesay is thought to have come from ‘stoches’ meaning cattle farm.

The Gatehouse is 17th century and is distinctively built in the Shropshire style.

The castle has been open to the public since 1908. It was left to English Heritage in 1992 by Jewell Magnus Allcroft.

There are events on through out the year, usually during school holidays, some of are Civil War Re-enactments.

It is open throughout the year but it is best to check opening hours and times. It is well worth visiting.

The image of Stokesay Castle above was taken by Penny Mayes and is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 license.

Stokesay Castle Gatehouse

Stokesay Castle Gatehouse

Mitchell’s Fold Stone Circle

Mitchell’s Fold is a Bronze Age stone circle that sits on high moorland 330m (1083 ft) above sea level at the south-west end of Stapely Hill.

It is thought that there were originally 30 stone pillars although now only 15 remain and these range in size from 0.25 m to 1.91 m. Although it is called a stone circle, the stones are in fact arranged in an ellipse 27 m NW-SE by 25 m.

The true history of Mitchell’s Fold – sometimes also called Medgel’s Fold or Madges Pinfold – is unknown, although the name of the circle may derive from ‘micel’ or ‘mycel’, Old English for ‘big’, referring to the size of this large circle.

Whether by design or coincidence the tallest of the remaining stones lies at the south-east end of the major axis close to the line of the southern moonrise.

The site is a Scheduled Ancient Monument (number 107448) in the guardianship of English Heritage.

There is an interesting legend concerning Mitchell’s Fold described in this BBC Archive article – although the truth is that the stones were placed on Stapely Hill by Bronze Age man about 4,000 years ago.

You can drive the 16 miles to Mitchell’s Fold in about 30 minutes and both entry and on-site parking are free. It is well worth the visit to experience the scale of these stone circles and enjoy the panoramic views.

Mitchell's Fold Picture

Mitchell’s Fold Picture

Here at Folly View we want you to enjoy all that Shropshire can offer and so we’ve chosen to decorate the walls of Folly View with maps and pictures that highlight local attractions – including the dramatic photograph of Mitchell’s Fold shown above.