Grants for Shropshire Market Towns

Shropshire Market Towns have been awarded £167,000 of grants to encourage visitors after the flooding earlier this year and of course in the aftermath of Covid 19.

Smaller Market Towns have been granted £50,000 between them. They will each be able to receive a grant of up to £5000.

Craven Arms Town Council are going to spread their grant over several initiatives.

They want to improve access and provide a secure environment for both locals and visitors after Covid 19. Not sure how this works, sounds good.

There will be money towards Local Produce Markets this Autumn in October and November, I do miss our Craven Arms Farmers Markets.

Money will be granted to Festive Events and the Christmas Lights.

There will also be joint admission offers for visitors attractions. A Passport scheme for all three of our visitor attractions, The Land of Lost Content, Stokesay Castle and The Shropshire Hills Discovery Centre, would be good. It would be good to see this before the end of this visitor season.

 

Shropshire opening

I have ventured into Ludlow and Church Stretton to see what is happening and what is open.  I have not been out and about much so some of this is gathered from guest and friends. This is not comprehensive.

So here is an idea of some places I know are open in Shropshire.

Ludlow Market is open with a one way system. The Castle and it’s cafe are open again for business.

Most shops were open except a few charity shops and some businesses which have unfortunately been effected by  Covid 19 Lockdown and will not open again. I am very sorry to see some of my favourite shops and cafes closed.

The car parks are busy but not full.

In Church Stretton most places seemed to be open although you may notice some changes when you enter them.  There are one way systems hand sanitizer stations and some places have shut off parts that are tricky with social distancing.

Heather Brae to the north of Church Stretton is open for business.

In Craven Arms the Shropshire Hills Discovery Centre is open, the cafe has less tables and was running  a less diverse menu.

The Land of Lost Content is open with a booking system.

Stokesay Castle is open, I don’t think the cafe is.

Ludlow Food Centre is open, I hear they have a very good system in side. The Plant Centre is also open and the Cafe.

Blists Hill is open, our last guests spent all day there when they ventured there.

In Craven Arms only one of the pubs is open, The Stables, drink only.

The Stokesay Inn has been taken over by local folks but is not yet open.

The Kangaroo at Aston On Clun is open with a booking system.

We hope when your come to Folly View you will find plenty to do

The Apple Tree at Onibury is open as is the Station at Marshbrook.

The take always in Craven Arms are open for business.

Don’t forget Tuffins do a lovely range of ready meals called Cook if you are not inclined to eat out.

 

Stokesay Castle in Photographs

Stokesay Castle

Stokesay Castle

This post shows Stokesay Castle in photographs. Stokesay Castle is a fortifyed medieval house and is considered the best preserved example in England. I’ve blogged about it before and this post provides some photographs that give more of a flavour of this unique building. The image of Stokesay Castle above was taken by Penny Mayes and is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 license.

Stokesay Castle is just one mile from Folly View Let and can be reached by footpaths from Folly View Let or by following the Shropshire Way from the Shropshire Hills Discovery Centre.

Stokesay Castle Gatehouse

Stokesay Castle Gatehouse

English Heritage manage Stokesay Castle and the current adult entrance fee is £7.60. Many of our visitors have commented how worthwhile and interesting it is to visit.

The Gatehouse at Stokesay Castle

The Gatehouse at Stokesay Castle

The Gatehouse is 17th century and is distinctively built in the Shropshire style.

Stokesay Castle Roof

Stokesay Castle Roof

The hall is 54.5 feet (16.6 m) long and 31 feet (9.4 m) wide and features three large, wooden 13th-century arches supporting the roof.

These photographs just provide a flavour of Stokesay Castle and many of our visitors to Folly View Let tell us that it is well worth a visit.

Stokesay Castle Tea Rooms

Stokesay Castle Tea Rooms

Stokesay Castle is one of the best-preserved fortified medieval manor houses in England. English Heritage who have restored Stokesay Castle, and who manage the property, have recently completed the conversion of nearby Stokesay Cottage – which stands beside the public entrance to the castle grounds – into a tea-room – the Stokesay Castle Tea Rooms.

Stokesay Castle Tea Rooms Tables

Stokesay Castle Tea Rooms Tables

 
An outside seating area is just visible in the photograph above – and offers visitors picturesque views across rolling fields to Long Mynd and the Shropshire Hills.

As well as the outdoor spaces the Tea Rooms feature a log burner to provide winter warmth for the anticipated visits from walkers and cyclists. The menu relies on locally-sourced ingredients and fresh foods including local specialities like Shropshire Fidget Pie, Shrewsbury Biscuits and Shropshire Blue. The focus on local food includes rosewater distilled from the roses in the castle courtyard used in the lavendar shortbread.

Serving Counter Stokesay Tea Rooms

Serving Counter in Stokesay Castle Tea Rooms

Stokesay Castle

Stokesay Castle

Stokesay Castle

Stokesay Castle is a fortifyed medieval house and is considered the best preserved example in England.

It forms a ‘comparatively complete ensemble’ of medieval buildings. The fact they remain largely unchanged is very unusual.

Previous owners have tried to repair what existed rather than rebuild and reconstruct.

It is Grade one listed and a scheduled Monument. It was largely build in the latter part of the 13th century by Laurence of Ludlow who was a wealthy wool merchant.

In the early part of the thirteenth century the land was owned by the de Say family who sold it to Laurence. The Stoke part of Stokesay is thought to have come from ‘stoches’ meaning cattle farm.

The Gatehouse is 17th century and is distinctively built in the Shropshire style.

The castle has been open to the public since 1908. It was left to English Heritage in 1992 by Jewell Magnus Allcroft.

There are events on through out the year, usually during school holidays, some of are Civil War Re-enactments.

It is open throughout the year but it is best to check opening hours and times. It is well worth visiting.

The image of Stokesay Castle above was taken by Penny Mayes and is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 license.

Stokesay Castle Gatehouse

Stokesay Castle Gatehouse