Ramble, Scramble, or Amble 2019

Ramble, Scramble, Amble is on Saturday 11th May 2019  starting from Bishops Castle with all proceeds going to Bloodwise.

With the start in Bishops Castle the Ramble Scramble Amble takes the walkers through some beautiful South Shropshire countryside.

View From Bury Ditches Hill Fort

View From Bury Ditches Hill Fort

The Ramble is a 22.5 mile circular walk.

The Scramble is 13 miles and the Amble is 9.5 miles.

The Ramble, Scramble, Amble  entry fee is £19 until April 1st when it will be £20. It includes instructions, refreshments, lunch (hot and vegetarian), transport as needed and a certificate. Closing date is 6th May.

The Ramble and Scramble start in Bishops Castle, lunch is provided in Clun where the Amblers are transported to to start their walk, with everyone finishing back in Bishops Castle.

The Scramble and Amble follow a shortened route of the Ramble. Some of the paths used are not usually open to the public.

The Ramble Scramble Amble take in Bury Ditches, The Walcott Estate, part of the Shropshire Way and some stunning views of the Shropshire Hills.

The routes are well signed and there are helpful marshalls and the route instructions are clear.

Bloodwise supports people with leukaemia, which is the fifth most common cancer in the UK. It also helps providing ground breaking research into leukaemia.

The photograph used in this post shows the view from Bury Ditches Hill Fort, South Shropshire. This image is taken from Wikimedia Commons and is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license.

Toposcope

I have mentioned the Toposcopes on the top of hills and hillforts and as I will talk about these places again I thought a brief description would be interesting.

A Toposcope is a monument indicating direction and distance of notable land marks

These landmarks can be hills, mountains, towns, the Sea, Battlefields or historical places.

They are usually at popular vantage points either where there is a 360 degree view or long reaching views.

The plaques are usually cast in bronze and in their simplest form have radiating lines which line up with the landmarks they indicate and the distance to them.

More complex Toposcopes have lines showing the shapes of the hills, the way you are looking, with their names and distance from where you are standing. There will also be compass points marked on them.

There is a Toposcope at the top of Flounders Folly.

One of my favourite is at Bury Ditches which gives a view all round and another is at Clee Hill Village at the car park which has views including the Malvern Hills.

Ride the Shropshire Marches

A well-earned cycling break

A well-earned cycling break

Ride the Shropshire Marches Sportive is on Sunday 21st May.

There are two distances 65 miles starting at 9.30am and 35 miles starting at 10 am.

The start and finish are at Wistanstow Village Hall. The entrance fees are £25 for the longer distance and £20 for the shorter distance.

The funds raised from this event will go towards replacing the windows of Wistanstow Village Hall.

There is breakfast at the start, refreshments half way round at Church Stoke and tea and a bottle of beer at the finish.

The ride takes in stunning views of South Shropshire lets hope its a clear day to make the most of those climbs.

The event is sponsored by Wood’s Brewery.

Hill Forts near Craven Arms

Hopesay Village and The Burrow

Hopesay Village and The Burrow

There are over fifty hill forts in Shropshire and there is access to a lot of them.

From our door there is Norton Camp. It can’t be seen from our house but is well worth the walk up through Whettleton.

Although covered in trees and shrubs, the ramparts are impressive. The interior is a field but you can walk round it.

Bury Ditches a few miles to the west is on Forestry Commission. There is a walk up from the car park and at the top outstanding views of the surrounding hills.

There is a toposcope at the top which tells you what the names of the hills are.

Nearer to home at Hopesay is the Burrow. There is parking on the road through Hopesay. The Burrow is on Forestry Commission Land as well.

I can show you where they are on the maps.

There are many theories about hill forts and they are probably used for different things at different times. Some would have been defensive, some would have been homesteads, and some used for holding animals.

At Round Oak is Wart Hill a small hill fort easily accessible from the road, this one is thought to have been an over night holding for sheep.